Question: Can You Domesticate A Giraffe?

Giraffes aren’t exactly wild beasts that need to be tamed, they’re not the apex predator that lions, tigers, and bears are.

They’re pretty docile creatures and at my local zoo they even have Giraffes trained to come up to a balcony to be fed and pet.

To be pets.

Can you legally own a giraffe?

Giraffes. Finally, there are nine states (Florida, Arkansas, Illinois, Louisiana, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Virginia, and Nebraska) where there is a partial ban on exotic animals, which means a giraffe would be illegal. In the remaining 20 states, owning an exotic animal is totally illegal.

Can you domesticate any animal?

An individual wild animal, or wild animal born in captivity, may be tamed—their behavior can be conditioned so they grow accustomed to living alongside humans—but they are not truly domesticated and remain genetically wild. For this reason, there are no domesticated breeds of Asian elephants: They remain wild animals.

How dangerous is a giraffe?

Although they’re more likely to run from an attack than fight back, giraffes are not completely defenseless. A swift kick from one of their long legs can do serious damage to—or even kill—an unlucky lion.

What Animals Can’t be domesticated?

Dogs, sheep, pigs, cows, horses – all these animals and more have been fundamentally changed by humans to make our lives better. Domestication has fundamentally altered the course of human history, reshaping the land and other species to fit our new agricultural lifestyle.

How much is a zebra?

How much will a zebra set you back? There are a handful of breeders around the country offering Plains zebras for $3,000 to $7,000, depending on their age and condition. (It’s illegal to trade in the other species, which are endangered, unless you own a zoo or wildlife sanctuary.)

How much does a cheetah cost?

Cheetah

These iconic wild cats exemplify grace, agility, ferociousness, and speed. Only sold on the black market, a cheetah cub can put you under $1000 to $2000. You need more than just a cage to hold them in, the “King of Race Tracks” needs space to roam. The upkeep of this pet is expensive.